Precious Metal ENHANCES Cancer Drugs?!

I’m not opposed to pharmaceutical drugs.  

I’m opposed to their high cost and dangerous side effects. 

But if there was a way to get all of the benefits of a drug, while minimizing its risk… well, that’s a scientific advance that would be hard to find fault with. 

And it looks like researchers from Europe have done just that. 

Using microscopic particles of a certain precious metal, researchers are able to enhance the effects of certain drugs… while limiting their side effects. 

It’s the medicine of the future. 

Scientists have just given us another reason to love gold – especially tiny, microscopic nanoparticles of gold. 

Nanoparticles are special because their small size allows them to get into places more easily and more quickly than their larger counterparts.  

Plus, they can be used as a vehicle to transport other substances – like pharmaceutical drugs – right where they need to go. 

As a result, a smaller dose of a drug can be more effective, and carry fewer side effects. 

Gold nanoparticles could also make vaccines more effective.  

In order for a vaccine to be effective, it has to reach B lymphocytes (a part of your immune system that helps protect you from infections) before it’s destroyed, and ideally without negatively impacting other cells along the way. 

Researchers tested various gold nanoparticles on B lymphocytes and found that gold spheres coated with a protective polymer were quickly and safely delivered to B lymphocytes. These “gold taxis” can transport existing drugs such as vaccines directly to these critical immune cells, reducing the dosage needed and the side effects experienced. 

Another benefit of gold is that it can absorb light and release heat.  

This property makes it extremely effective against tumors because when the gold is exposed to light, it will release heat that destroys the cancers cells all around it.  

But wait, there’s more!  

Because these gold nanoparticles are so small, they can cross the bloodbrain barrier, which opens the possibility of delivering anti-tumor drugs to tumors located in the brain. 

All of this research is still in the early stages, but the initial results look very promising – a hopeful glimpse into what medicine could look like in the future.